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of this year and removing the rest of the 33,000 u.s. search wars from afghanistan by the end of the summer in 2012. these reductions are part of an ongoing process of transitioning increasing responsibility for afghanistan security, the afghan security forces, which by 2014 would have leader was on stability for security throughout the country. the chorus which the company says provides a strategy for success in afghanistan. the afghan security forces have increased by almost 100,000 since the president announced the surge in december december 2009.afghan army will expand by another 70,000 security forces by the time all of the u.s. surge forces are brought home by september of 2012. the growing capabilities of the afghan security forces provide the afghan people would want melter of afghan elders have asked eunice and told me that they want the most, which is the ability to secure their own country themselves. having ask you forces in the lead puts the lie to the taliban propaganda that international forces are there to occupy afghanistan. the afghans taken over their own security is the
and afghanistan. it will serve as an insurance policy for the future interactions between afghanistan and the united states. host: what is your country doing currently to prepare for the pullout of the 33,000 troops by 2014? guest: we have made a plann. we have areas already identified from different parts of the country where our security forces will take full responsibility for security while the international coalition forces will gradually pulled u back. other elements for securing various will develop and surge. to get the heart and mind of the people, we should deliver basic services based on their needs. we should have projects in those areas. meanwhile, we should work with communities directly on things they need based on the properties that our government should deliver it to them. host: which area is the most dangerous and poses the most challenges for the security forces? guest: the seven areas are chosen carefully in different parts of the country. those areas are quite calm right now. there's not much challenge as far as security is concerned. we will see when we start th
, that there is no military solution to conflicts we're fighting today as in iraq, as in afghanistan, that in the end the resolution of this will be a political matter. and you say that's wrong. the first order of business in winning a war is to kill the enemy fighters. very forthright statement, but one that does go against the grain. and i would ask you to look at afghanistan today and assess whether you think that approach of killing enemy fighters is going to lead us to something that could be called a military solution. >> guest: yes, i do but i'm not saying the military solution is the only part of the solution that matters. there has to be that military solution. there has to be the position of a mine any enemy that you're going to get killed if you go up against the americans. i think that's what's going on in afghanistan now. there was something in iraq in the awakening of the sunnis to the rest of the country, the idea that this is a tribal battle but the americans are not going to be the strongest try. i think that is something that is now being impressed upon the various elements, the tal
about nation building, failed states, afghanistan, iraq, somalia, iraq, haiti, the foreign policy challenges that we've faced weapon have the illusion which i would call the problem of getting to denmark. denmark is in quotations. it's not a real country. it's the mythical place that have low corruption, democracy, stable government, good services delivered very efficiently and so forth. we have the vision of denmark in the back of our heads and go to a place like afghanistan. how are we going to get afghanistan to look like denmark? and it doesn't work very well. and part of the reason that i began to realize was that we don't understand how denmark got to be denmark. i had a visiting professorship, so i've been going. most danes have no idea how denmark got to be denmark. it struck me as a political scientist, this ought to be a book you can go to to say where did political institutions come from. i didn't see one. so i decided to write it. that's why we get the book that i've produced. so i also did not want to write a book on the origins of politics that told this traditional
persecuted because they are christians, whether it be in afghanistan, whether it be in pakistan or in the egypt and all over, the two questions that i have. how many convictions have there been over the last several years? and how many occasions do you know where the american embassy has advocated for these cases? because generally been there is a problem for the members go to the and become the advocate for how many convictions do you know have been cases brought in the egyptian courts and how many times has the american embassy participated and been involved in any different case? >> thank you very much, mr. wolfe. there has been in the 50 cases of i was involved with personally, there were two investigations. meter investigation resulted in any legal process. so there are no convictions resulting as the complaints to the effect of kidnapping forced marriages and forced conversions of coptic christian women. to my knowledge also and according to my research, the u.s. embassy has not advocated on behalf of these women. >> one nice thing, mr. chairman, as you have the record i u
university professor. after this break, we will talk more politics and legislation and afghanistan with our roundtable, conn carroll and jamelle bouie. be right back. ♪ >> monday on c-span, the dali lama -- dalai lama and martin luther king, jr.'s speechwriter. they spoke about a number of topics, including the death penalty. >> the number of people who kill through violence -- are killed through violence, over 200 million. but problem not solved. i think that people lay down a seed of hatred. >> watch this discussion monday at 6:30 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> monday night on c-span, look back at president nixon's foreign policy. members of his administration and the president's son-in-law discuss topics including communism in china, invading north vietnam, and the 1967 war in the middle east. >> the discussion then in the newspapers were nixon's secret plan for peace. what was it? of course, he never talked about it. that was rockefeller pushing nixon to say something, to expose what his plan was. rockefeller did not think that nixon had a plan. he comes in after a hard day of campaigning
at the white house. >> heather: defense secretary leon panetta traveling to afghanistan. he says that the u.s. is targeting up to 20 key leaders of the al-qaeda based on information gathered during that raid on osama bin laden's compound in pakistan and terror group is now within reach. david is live from kabul, afghanistan. >> reporter: the duly appointed defense secretary arrived here a few hours ago to find out for himself the situation on the ground here. he has brief talks with military officials including david petraeus and then he went straight into a meeting with the afghan president hamid karzai. their discussions included the transition of nato held areas of afghan control starting in july but also the drawdown of u.s. troops over the next year. he says he hopes to drive the taliban into peace talks over that period. he also said he was upbeat about prospects of defeating al-qaeda if they can capture and kill remaining leaders. >> i would say somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders, between pakistan, yemen, so somalia and north africa, if we can go after them, i think we really can
president obama will announce how many troo will bring home from afghanistan beginning next month. the announcement follows months of debate in the white house, it comes with increasing concern in the war andure role in the country. the administration fac a number of challenges at home. unemployment remains high at 9.1%. the housing market continues to suffer and the u.s. debt has surpassed 14 trillion dollars. all of this will pose a significant challenge for the president in the 2012 eltion. joining me now a group of comments from the new york time from washington david brooks, with me here in new york, david leonhardt, roger cohen and tom friedman. they have all won too many awards to talk about. mi pleased to have all of them on this program today to talk about america. what's the challenge for us? because wherever i go around the world the thing they say is tt we want america to take care of their business at home first, so that they can lead the world and pla an important part as the rest of the world changes. >> well, charlie, i think the world does understan that america p
, or afghanistan, or iraq, or not so secret 'secret' war in yemen, somehow can solve this problem; they are making a serious mistake. all the war in the world is only going to exacerbate this hunger crisis. of course what we need is farmers that in a stable environment can plant high yield crops and get the support that they need to earn their livelihoods and help feed their populations. we need a different approach; peace will come through sustainable development; and this is the absolutely the most vitalrealisation that we need to make in the world. >>reporter: still to come on world business... >>from a war torn country on the brink of starvation to stellar success, we look at the rise of vietnam >>and competitive climbing is not hanging around in its quest to attract new fans. >>scaling new heights... and the rest in just a moment on world business... >>25 years ago vietnam started reforms to move the country from a planned economy to a socialist oriented market economy. reforms that have transformed both the country and the lives of its people. >>reporter: every morning for thousands of vietn
for you. >>> canada pulled the last of the combat troops out of afghanistan this week. this brings us to our question of the week. how many nations still have combat troops in afghanistan as part of the international security assistance force? is it a, 6, b, 16, c, 26 or d 46. stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. go to cnn.com/gps for ten more questions. while you're there, make sure you check out our website, the global public square where you'll find smart interviews and essays and takes by our favorite experts. you will also find all of our gps shows. if you miss one, you can click and watch. don't forget, you can follow us on twitter and facebook. this week's book of the week is the last narco. it takes you deep inside the life of a man known as elchapo now that bin laden is dead, this mexican drug king pin is the number one most wanted man in the world. he's also on forbes list of the world top billionaires, it's a fascinating look at the man, the operation and international hunt for him. very well written. and now for the last look. we often think our politicians ar
insurance. >>> can a day pulled the last of its troops out of afghanistan this week. that brings us to our question of the week -- how many nations still have combat troops in afghanistan as part of the international security assist tansz force? is it 6, 16, 26 or 46? stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. make sure you go to cnn.com/gps for ten more question and make sure you check out the global public square don't forget, you can also follow us on twitter and facebook. this week's "book of the week" is the "the last narco." it takes you deep into the life. now that bin laden is dead, this mexican drug kingpin is the number one most ban wanted man in the world, also on "forbes" list of the world's top billionaires. it's a fascinating look at the man. very well written. >>> we often think or politicians are always bickering. it might make you feel better to look at the case of australia, where it seems lawmakers have been literally been fighting like cats and dogs. listen to this. >> if i can finish now. >> why don't you meow when a woman does that. >> yes. what you hear there
" reported last year by jason carroll. he's back in afghanistan with one of those soldiers, sergeant randy shorter. >> sergeant shorter was part of the surge who arrived last august. his one-year mission is nearly complete. jason is live from shirr rana in the northeastern part of afghanistan. happy fourth of july to you, nice to see you. >> and happy fourth of july to you. i'm going to bring in randy shorter right now. i have to tell you, we now have to refer to him as first sergeant randy shorter because he's since been promoted since the last time the two of us were together. let me bring you in here now. tell us about, what was it september, august, the last time i was with you guys? >> tell me what the past several months have been like? the taliban has been exerting its influence in the area. how has it been for you? >> for me and my men it's been quite busy. getting out there, getting after it. we've been steadily, you know, helping the afghan people here. we've been promoting a lot of projects, a lot of schools, getting out there every day. >> also, congratulations on that promotio
challenge to the military will leave afghanistan and iraq around the world the budget challenges that face the country. in little over a month, we will mark the tenth anniversary of 9/11. we will honor the victims of that day including 184 people who were tragically taken out by the attack on this very building. and we will renew our commitment to america's dern ability to remain vigilant to these old and new threats that we face, and we are going to redouble with your leadership our efforts to disrupt and feet the terrorists who continue to plot against the united states adding to the great work you have done over the agency. and we will express the american people's appreciation for our armed services, and i might add, and all of you know this who wear a uniform, and your family. the families of the 9/11 generation -- and it's hard to think about it, at least for me, from 9/11, we are, you know, we are ten years away from that day. a lot of these kids were 12 to 15 and under at the time the attack took place and the stepped up this younger generation stepped up to the fact of not just th
. we can't expect america with all its economic and other problems and with afghanistan to pull our chestnuts out of the fire. >> rose: but on the question of nato, secretary gates suggested as much. >> rose: indeed. indeed. witness again, you know, a few weeks of military action on a very small scale in libya... >> rose: and all of a sudden... >> and we're running out of munitions and turning back to the united states as the land of last rest. but look, frankly, the military action in libya which i supported, reluctantly but i supported, i actually a sideshow. the big question is can you turn egypt which had been historically at the heart of islamic culture and scholarship into a model and a beacon for threst of the arab world in. >> rose: and your answer is likely? unlikely? too soon to tell? >> look, i mean, there's amaze pog ten nshl egypt and then a highly educated young people, a strong middle-class, a great sense of history and tradition. but it could all go pear shaped between armyn the one hand which is now proving an unam big rouse friend of liberal democracy and the musli
. caller: donald trump wants to set went to iraq and afghanistan because they were oil-rich nations. we won the war. i don't think and buying debt these days. host: about what the question that those did contribute to the problems we are having right now. guest: everything did continue. the question is what percentage. i would disagree saying the president has tremendous leverage. he has no leverage. the democrats and the republicans and congress are going to make this deal. one or both of them are going to leave town and dump it on his lap. the poling is really unhelpful, often ends in these things. on one hand they want cuts and spending. they an over 60% want the capital plan. the president is appearing more favorable than congress. the president always does. the president's rating have been going down dramatically. because of that. because the president doesn't feel comfortable, they don't want this issue to come up again until 2012. they don't want to have this again until 2012. they want to talk about other things. we have this situation now where this debate has paralyzed the country
-- the other factor is that we are now drawing down the cost of our military efforts in afghanistan and iraq. last year we spent a little over $150 billion. this year we'll spend a little over $100 billion. and the plan is to soon be down to at least $50 billion in two or three years. so over the ten-year period there'll be about eight years at nearly $50 billion or so spent on the war instead of $150 billion. that's part of the plan that we've been operating on for a long time. $150 billion for the war is not baseline expenditure of the united states. it was never projected to continue at that level, so hopefully we could bring it below $50 billion. maybe we went get to $50 billion. i don't know. but what is the reasonable estimate? i think the house republicans and the president said it would drop to $50 billion, and that would be the baseline out there for the rest of the time. that's $1 trillion. that's $1 trillion. so you take $1 trillion out of the $2.7 trillion, you're down to $1.7 trillion. and another thing that's scored in that, since that $1 trillion in war costs is scored the way
, republican congress and the bush years, wars in iraq, wars in afghanistan not paid for, prescription drug bill not paid for, and bush tax cuts for wealthiest americans which have caused most of the deficit, and the problem with the debt ceiling. now we are not calling on them to make some sacrifice and pay for it. most everybody in america knows about dieting. most of us are a little overweight. michelle obama will tell you that any day. we need to watch our weight. but when you go to diet, you got to reduce your calories, and you got to exercise some more. spend some calories, reduce some calories. that's the way you diet. the same thing with the budget. you got a problem at home with your budget, well, maybe you think i won't take that vacation and go to miami beach and stay in that three star hotel, i'll go to fort walton and stay in a two star hotel and maybe get another job or work some more overtime. increase your income, you decrease your spending. and you get it together. this congress, though, has got the problem because in dealing with this and the debt ceiling is independent of
to advocate for people who are being persecuted because they're christians whether it be in afghanistan, pakistan or egypt. and the two questions that i have, how many connections have there been -- convictions have there been over the last several years, do you have any -- and how many occasions do you know where the american embassy has advocated for these cases? generally, when there's a problem, members go to the embassy, they advocate it. how many times has the american embassy participate and been involved in any different cases? >> thank you very much, mr. wolf. there have been, in the 50 cases i was involved with personally, there were two investigations, neither investigation resulted in any legal process, so there are no convictions, um, resulting as of, as of complaints to the effective kidnappings, forced marriages and forced converses of coptic christian women. to my knowledge, also, and according to my research the u.s. embassy has not advocated on behalf of these women. >> one last thing, mr. chairman. as you have this record, i urge you to send it to leon panetta. our mi
trove of documents that have been released in the last year. the iraq war logs, the afghanistan war logs, and what has been called cablegate, as the u.s. state department documents that are continuing to be released. why does it matter so much? we will talk about that this afternoon, but let's just take one example that came out in the iraq war logs. february 2007. the war log show that to give you zero men were standing, iraqis under an apache helicopter. the men have their hands up. they clearly are attempting to surrender. the apache helicopter can see this. so they are not wrote. the soldiers called back to the base and asked what they should do. the lawyer in the bass says you cannot surrender to a helicopter, and they blow the man attempting to surrender away. that was february 2007. now, we will fast forward to july 12, 2007. video that has been released by wikileaks. this devastating video of an area of baghdad where a group of men were showing around two reuters journalists. one was an up-and-coming videographer, and one was this driver. he was 40 years old, father of four. they
, including more than 100,000 in afghanistan, 92,000 in iraq, 79,000 in europe, and 43,000 in east asia and the pacific. hats off to all of you today. >>> let's go around the world with manita. you may be one of my older friends at cnn because we worked together even before we got here. what a pleasure to see you. busy morning. tell us about what's going on in chi china. >> yeah, it's good to see you, as well, ali. it has been a while. yeah, china, what we're dealing with right now there is another situation in which this country is not immune to. it has seen a lot of this situation happen before. we're talking about miners trapped in coal mines. what we understand, the southern part of china has been dealing with some torrential downpours and heavy rains. what has happened is that sum of these mines have been overflowed and have been flowing with a lot of the rain and water trapping some 40 miners in 2 separate coal mines. what they understand, some three bodies have already been pulled out. the fact of the matter is the heavy rains are also making it difficult for rescuers to actually
, and we were doing great things over there. >> the 19-year-old served in afghanistan on the scout sniper platoon and we are gla he is home safe and grateful to our troops, as always, this 4th of july weekend. >> those are the headlines and now we send it over to rick for weather. rick: the summer is feeling like the end of summer for so many. look how june shaped up for us across so much. a lot of texas, the hottest junes ever in midland. and miami, florida, the driest june on record. and tulsa, oklahoma, 29 days above 90 degrees and that ties a record. and now the drought monitor: a lot of drought across the southern area of the united states from arizona to florida and the drought now beginning to stretch across the mid-atlantic. we need rain. we will not get it. and now, a look at what we have for the day today, it is actually quite a nice day with showers down across florida, and hot across the plains, and 102 in wichita and in the west we will see a nice day, finally, the west has been cool, and 77 in seattle with warm conditions and hot across the southwest. and, dave, over to you.
'm not a warmonger i don't want another war. we are already tied up in iraq, afghanistan and for some reason libya. but the only way to stop iran is with clear military force. sanctions are great but at the end of the day they are not going to work. at the end of the day iranian regime is motivated by, again, an ideology. it's a messianic ideology. they truly believe and they will shape policy around this, the iranian government truly believe that they can punish in the end times. >> host: this would be the 12th? >> guest: that goes by various names. he is the islamist must live. this all sounds crazy i know but they really believe this. the likes of ahmadinejad. they believe that if they strike out against israel, if they acquire nuclear weapons, if there's a ton of great global chaos and a people which are seeing right now with this arab spring, they believe that can hasten the return of the islamist messiah who believed lead them to victory over israel and the west. so acquiring nuclear weapons is part of that divine plan. nothing will deter them or dissuade them from this goal. they believe it
the caller is right certainly in the case of pakistan and afghanistan. the united states lost sight of the importance of the region after the soviet the feet. certainly, i would hope there would be a sustained engagement that would be based on mutual respect and upon the principles that we mentioned earlier. with regards to what he mentioned about dealings in pakistan and elsewhere towards the united states, people in the middle east largely very much admire the united states for its educational institutions, the level of economic development, the basic rule of law, and so on. they were to come here, a study here, emigrate here, but there critical of some american policies. that is really the issue. we know what those policies are. host: last couple of calls. bloomington, illinois. caller: first of all, i just want to respond to the caller that the military saved muslims in southeast europe in kosovo. here is my question regarding europe. are there any elements in the arab spring in north africa that wants to integrate with europe? maybe in the future join the european union? at one
to pakistani scholars. i am pleased to see maybe one of those scholars re-ask con whose new book on afghanistan was written while he was a scholar is with us today. rh a program has undertaken an extensive review of the economics assistance program and we will roll out the conclusions of that later this year. the house foreign affairs committee yesterday, sand that means walled off running for economic assistance and military assistance to pakistan until the president certifies that the area has adequate cooperation on counterterrorism. that is just one house committee but that is a move that some feel including me may go in the wrong direction, economic assistance i would argue is absolutely crucial. president musharraf's speech this morning comes in a timely moment. relations between our two countries are more strained today than at any time in the past 10 years. eight of our countries needs the other for the achievement of important strategic object this. yet most of the public discussion of the bilateral relationship focuses on our divisions and are as agreements. perhaps a day's session wi
. somalia, chad, sudan, congo, haiti. zimbabwe, afghanistan, central african republic and iraq. guest: 2z no accident some of those countries have ended up at the worst end of the index. if you look at somalia, it is a country experiencing next, what does that mean for the wider world. we see there is enormous refugee flows. we've seen in the last couple of decades where there have been significant concerns here in washington about the ability of terrorists to operate due to the lack of governing. that is really why we should care that these states are there and should really take notice. for anyone who is at all familiar with international affairs, it doesn't take the fail-safe influence. if you see some of those other countries on the list, it's important to do those as well. if it weren't for bringing 240ez issues forward, the public is experiencing serious trouble. the countries are experiencing serious trouble. that's one of the key aspects. we are talking about the 2011 fail-state influence. here to talk with us is discussions. to get involved in the discussion call 202-624-1111 for
-- the international computer underground." but with the iraq war logs, the afghanistan war laws, and the u.s. cables that have yet to be fully release, i would say that julian assange is perhaps the most widely published purpose on earth. -- person on earth. today will have a conversation about information and i would like to ask julianne to begin -- julian to begin by going back to that moment in 2007, and talk about the significance of those for you and why you have chosen to release this information. >> amy, on that criteria, perhaps rupert murdoch's goal most widely published person on earth, and people have said that australia has given two people to the world, rupert murdoch and me. begin publishing. [laughter] in some ways, things are very easy for us and for me. we make a promise to sources that if they give us material of a certain type of significance, of diplomatic, historic, or ethical significance, and they are under a certain threat, we will publish it. that is actually and up. we have a goal with publishing material. it has been my long-term believe that what advances of civilization
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)